Archive for the ‘HTML’ Category

Web Development History Is Amazing

Last year marked a revolution in back-end design. The major force behind this change was not just a need for better functionality but for a better process in Web development. In an industry survey from 1999, Web startups found that 80 percent of their budget was typically spent on development costs. These companies also observed that the best sites redesign every two months. The enormous development costs got people’s attention. Complex, transaction-heavy sites were demanding better processes. The old one-tier sites with static HTML or just CGI were fading away, and even the newer, two-tier systems like flat ASP or Cold Fusion were becoming impossible to keep clean and updareable.

wdhWhat is meant exactly by tiered site architecture? The three

Let’s Talk HTML Basics

HTMLHTML documents are plain-text, also known as ASCII files, that can be created using any simple text editor like Notepad or WordPad on Windows. It is best to create your code with these simple text editors as opposed to Word or WordPerfect, which may reformat your code as you create it. You are probably wondering how any lowly text editor could design such sophisticated-looking Web sites. Well, it’s the Web browser that determines how the page actually looks. The browser reads the text, looks for HTML markings, then visually displays the page according to the instructions.

The only drawback to this is that it is impossible to know what your page will look like when it is done. Fortunately,

Sorting Out The XML And HTML Fun

Developers of the Internet didn’t borrow from Bush’s blueprint; as computer gurus are inclined to do, they created connections to at least one obscurely applicable Web site on every subject imaginable. And it all became a reality, in large part, because of Hypertext Markup Language, or HTML, which arranges text and images on Web browsers.

soxhFor all its promise, however, HTML also has shortcomings–the most notable of which is its inability to distinguish between the presentation of computer data and the data itself. This is why HTML is fine for sending electronic documents but ill-equipped for direct data exchanges between computers on the Web, a function crucial to the advancement of Web-based education and other real-time Internet pursuits.

This shortfall